2021

Instructional Design: How Does it Link to Professional Facilitation?

Instructional Design Professional Facilitation

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When you visualize a teacher, what is the first thing that you imagine? The most straightforward answer to this is a person standing in front of a group of learners, providing them information, demonstrating a concept, asking questions, and overseeing them. Even the ones working as teachers or facilitators also picture themselves as sitting on a table and grading a handful of assignments and assessments.

When you visualize a teacher, what is the first thing that you imagine? The most straightforward answer to this is a person standing in front of a group of learners, providing them information, demonstrating a concept, asking questions, and overseeing them. Even the ones working as teachers or facilitators also picture themselves as sitting on a table and grading a handful of assignments and assessments.

Did you notice that you thought about them in terms of their performance in front of the whole class when you visualized a teacher? We presume that a facilitator’s job circles around the following performance indicators:

  1. Optimized delivery of information 
  2. Interactive sessions with the learners 
  3. Assign activities and grade assessments 


Thus, we think of a facilitator’s role as an evaluator. Many do not realize that a facilitator’s job was never to simply deliver the information, interact with the learners, and grade them on their learning. Let’s learn more about the role of a facilitator.

A Facilitator’s Role Is to Plan What the Participants Should Learn and How They Learn It

Thus, a facilitator should always be thinking less about their performance and more about what is going on in the learner’s mind and, thus, plan accordingly. They should ask the following questions to themselves again and again:

  1. How can they translate the curriculum in ways that make sense to the learner?
  2. How to make the learners ready to learn and keep them engaged?
  3. What will the learners remember in weeks, months, and years following this curriculum?
  4. How can they design a practical, helpful, and meaningful learning experience for the learners?
  5. How to describe the curriculum in the most concise, clear, and precise statements that might keep the learners on track throughout the learning program?

This is called deep work. Facilitators should design instructions that take deep consideration of participant’s learning. The facilitators should plan collaboratively. It should be done individually by the facilitators, thus corresponding to instructional design. The facilitators are responsible for the creation of developing and designing all instruction materials. It includes presentation materials, handouts, job aids, participant guides, and similar materials. The factor that makes this approach effective is that it goes far beyond assessment activities and writing assignments. This approach stays successful because it extends past the facilitator’s performance. It addresses all the aspects of demonstrated participant learning and caters to all enterprises’ needs.

The Facilitator’s Role Now Extends to Instructing, Organizing, Assigning, And Assessing 

These functions are not easy to perform, but they have critical importance. In the previous step, we clarified that the facilitator’s role is to plan, but it is still not apparent that planning is not visible. Here comes the instructional design.

What is Instructional Design?

It is the practice of systematically developing and designing the instructional material using consistent products and experiences. It includes physical as well as digital experiences. Its primary goal is to acquire an appealing, inspiring, and engaging acquisition of knowledge. It focuses on the learner’s needs and state while defining the goals of instructions that are designed. It also focuses on creating an intervention to assist learning transition if in case it occurs. Finally, this practice’s outcome can be hidden or assumed and scientifically measurable, and directly observable. 

Even when the instructional design is into action, you can deepen your understanding by asking yourself specific questions, including:

  1. Can I explain the goals that I have set for the learners?
  2. Am I maximizing the learner’s development for the long-run?
  3. Will my approaches help learners acquire practical knowledge?
  4. Are there any assumptions that influence my choice of activities?
  5. What kinds of intellectual and analytical skills do learners need for these activities?

These questions will divert your attention towards the true goals of education. Always remember that the learning and training which might start in the classroom will go beyond it. Thus, if you focus on instructional design, you are considering the bigger picture of what you and the learners might be doing and why. Thus, it offers you the justification of how the training and learning curriculum will help the learners in the future. 

The Facilitator’s Role Now Extends to Shifting Complete Focus on Participant Learning

Did you know that throughout the process of instructional design, your primary driver was participant learning? Now you have naturally aligned the core elements of teaching, including planning, instructing, and assessing the learners. You should take into account the learner’s readiness. This leads us to the final step in developing an instructional design that examines the instructional design in detail. It is essential to realize that you cannot share those practices with your colleagues and learners unless you have identified, articulated, and optimized your practices. 

Deep instructional design requires more hard work and more time. It requires the facilitators to plan what the learners will do from the beginning to the end of the workshop, program, or training course. Furthermore, activity planning and participant learning are part of instructional design. It would help if you extended it to focus on participants and classroom analysis accompanied by your performance analysis. Activity planning alone is highly superficial. You should engage yourself towards more innovative planning and focus on what is happening beyond the classroom activities. 

How To Become Instructional Designer

Final Word

The instructional design comprises systematically planning and focusing on the long-term results of knowledge acquisition by developing and designing optimized instructions for the learners’ curriculum from the beginning to the end. The facilitators should do it to ensure valuable participant experience and optimal learning experience design. If you are unsure how to find out all the answers or do it all by yourself, contact us today!

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